RSS

Category Archives: Being HR

#Cognitive #Biases That #Impact #Decision #Process

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 17, 2017 in Being HR

 

#Sourcing &#Productivity #Tools for #Tech #Recruiters

List Of Sourcing And Productivity Tools For Recruiters In Tech
By Recruitingblogs.com

Productivity

  • Google Docs + Google SpreadSheets + Blockspring + IFTT/Zapier integrations + a ton of Google add-ons available in the Chrome Web Store.
  • Extensity — to easily manage (enable/disable) all your Chrome extensions.
  • Trello — an easy-to-use task/project management tool.
  • Gmail-to-Trello — Gmail power optimization + other handy features such as email tracking, “send later”, etc.
  • Google Alerts — to easily track all web changes, trends, etc. that you are interested in.
  • G-Drive — a no-brainer for organisation and collaboration.
  • Data-Miner.io — for scraping data from web pages and into a CSV file or Excel spreadsheet.
  • Save to Pocket — allows you to catch and save all of the discovered data. Must have!
  • Calend.ly — to manage your schedule.
  • Monosnap — a fast and easy to use screenshot tool.
  • Dropbox — for sharing docs with a team.
  • Scanner Pro — a handy app to quickly scan any doc; available for iOS and Android.
  • Slack — a great team collaboration tool. It can also be used for talent hunting.

Search

Background Analytics

  • Aevy — scours the web to help you find and get in touch with skilled candidates.
  • Hiretual — a complete sourcing, screening/analytics and a bit of ATS solution.
  • Elucify — never waste time searching for prospect emails again. Find any business email address, target your leads with laser precision.
  • OctoHR — provides brief analytics about candidate’s GitHub profile activities and has some search features.
  • Goodwin from Relink Labs — a free service powered by the Relink Goodwin API. It’s still in beta but already allows you to do research by a job title. It will come up with the related previous jobs, relevant areas, keywords, and anything else that can be useful while doing role-related research.
  • Crystal — a complete solution for personality type screening.

Boolean/X-ray Sourcing

  • PDF Search Engine — a handy customized search engine for finding candidates’ resumes through the web.
  • SourceHub — a free and complete X-ray builder for more than 15 social media platforms from the Social Talent community.
  • RecruitEm — a free and super handy X-ray builder for LinkedIn, GitHub, StackOverflow, Dribble, Google+, Twitter and even Xing.
  • InHiro — allows you to bookmark candidates from the web as you browse their social profiles.
  • MultiHighlighter — a super handy and absolutely free tool. Sourcing for a specific skill set? Just enter your keywords and the extension will highlight each of them on the page.

Sourcing on GitHub and LinkedIn

  • Git Search — cool upgrades on the GitHub advanced search capabilities.
  • GitHub Search — the same as the above mentioned but more search features are available.
  • GitHub-find — allows you to find similar repositories on GitHub.
  • Git-Awards — top users by a programming language, repositories star ranking, country, city, etc. Really handy and free to use!
  • WhatRuns — allows you to see what tech stack is currently used by the website/company.
  • Datacruit — enables you to bookmark visited profiles on LinkedIn and save notes within the candidate’s profile.
  • GlossaryTech — scans and highlights all the technical terms mentioned in the profile, provides their clear, concise definitions, as well as allow you to filter the terms by category (Front-end, Back-end, QA, etc.).

Interviewing

  • ClickMeeting — video interviews, conferences, webinars and other similar stuff.
  • Interact — a free tech interviewing platform that is capable of conducting live coding interviews as well as creating all kinds of pre-evaluation tasks.
  • Pramp — a similar platform to the above, but with a bit different functionality included.
  • Travefy — to make your final interview itinerary look sharp.

Finding Contacts

  • Email Auto Extractor — easy extraction of emails from the web page, social media profile, etc.
  • Email Permutator + Rapportive — generates all possible candidate’s emails and verifies each of them in Gmail, until Rapportive says that there’s a match. Easy as it actually is.
  • Mybulkemailverifier.com — a free bulk email verifier. Upload a CSV file or add manually — both options are acceptable.
  • ManyContacts — a superb tool which extracts all emails from the web page (even if it’s a Google spreadsheet with a huge amount of emails) and allows you to see what social media accounts are related to each of the emails.
  • ContactOut — a free tool for finding candidates’ emails that allows you to extract LinkedIn profile data to the specific Google Spreadsheet in your Google Drive.
  • Mixmax — great for email management and has some awesome features, including a calendar tool.
  • Nymeria — an email finder for both personal and business emails.
  • Lusha — finds email addresses and phone numbers from anywhere on the web, with just one click.
  • Prophet — finds emails, phone numbers, social profiles and more.

Recruiting Software

  • Greenhouse — an ATS and recruiting software for the entire hiring process.
  • Entelo — provides a large net of candidates due to it being a data aggregator; much better for those harder to find candidates.
  • Close.io — inside sales software CRM with calling and emailing.

Writing/Emailing

  • Gorgias Templates — handy templates/snippets to paste in this very moment.
  • Textio — AI powered job descriptions and cold recruiting emails analysis.
  • Text Expander — enables you to instantly insert snippets of text from a repository of emails, boilerplate and other content as you type — using a quick search or abbreviation.
  • Auto Text Expander — another tool to create custom keyboard shortcuts to expand and replace text as you type.
  • Grammarly for Chrome — helps to eliminate your grammar errors and even detect plagiarism and check the contextual spell (for the premium subscription users ).
  • Mixmax — allows you to send engaging emails with instant scheduling, free unlimited email tracking, polls, and surveys right in Gmail.
  • Yesware —an email tracking and follow-up tool.
  • Doubletick — email tracking for Gmail.
  • YAMM  one more tool for mail merge.
  • MailerLite — affordable (free for up to 1000 subscribers (=candidates) in the list) email marketing software for your cold recruiting efforts. Responsive HTML email templates, A/B testing and much more are available with a freemium subscription.

To Learn Some Code

  • CodeFights — cool challenges on every programming languages. A truly engaging coding journey for all levels.
  • SoloLearn — how-to courses on each programming language. Challenges and a public glossary — very informative for newbies.
  • FreeCodeCamp — free, open-sourced certification for responsive web development enthusiasts. A certificate of completion is available for free.
  • Codecademy — one more great resource to become a programmer
 

#Effective #Job #Description- 15 Tips 

Image Content : gethppy.com

 
 

#HR #Word:#Deep #Work

“The type of work that optimizes your performance is deep work.”

The idea of ‘deep work’ is nothing new. The term was recently coined by Cal Newport, a professor, scientist, and author of “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World.” Below are few extracts.

How to create meaningful work

Deep work does not have to be tedious. In fact, it can be enjoyable, creative, meditative, and thought-provoking. Here are some tactics to integrate the principles of deep work into your schedule:

  1. Work deeplyIt takes great patience and practice to get to the point where you can integrate long stretches of deep work into your schedule. Newport created an equation to explain the intensity required of deep work and compared it to students who pulled all-nighters in college.

Work accomplished = (time spent) x (intensity)

Work at a high level with dynamic and intense intervals that increase over time to produce a desirable outcome. Get in the zone for at least 90 minutes and build up to periods that last anywhere from two to four hours, or more.

  1. Protect your time. Maintain a set of rituals and routines to ease deep work into your day more easily. Try implementing scheduling tactics into your workflow like:

Tallies – Keep a tally of the hours you spend working, or when you reach important milestones like pages read or words written.

Deep scheduling – Try scheduling deep work hours well in advance on a calendar, like two or four weeks ahead of time.

Scheduling and tracking time has a huge benefit of giving time back. Many academics, authors, and scientists have been able to produce ample amount of work while working normal hours and having time for personal pursuits or family on evenings and weekends.

  1. Train your brain to do nothing. Try for a moment, to sit still and do nothing. How long do you find it takes until the social stimuli and buzzing signals of your mobile device prove too much? If you can embrace sitting quietly meditating or thinking, or even staring into space, then you can train your brain to spend more time in deeper work.
  1. Quit swimming upstreamDecide for yourself what restrictions you can place on email and social media by removing it from your work week altogether, or by logging out and staying off for an entire day. Evaluate your personal and professional life and experiment where social fits and where it doesn’t. Your result may be a month-long digital detox, or completely cutting the cord on social.
  1. Cut the shallow workEndless meeting requests and instant email responses are turning knowledge workers into ‘human routers’ that create the shallow work that defines many of workplaces. We’ve been groomed to reply and respond because it feels like we’re accomplishing something, when in reality, we’re not.

“Spend enough time in a state of frenetic shallowness,” Newport warns, “and you permanently reduce your capacity to perform deep work.”

Courtesy :Excerpts from below link 👇

https://blog.evernote.com/blog/2017/02/23/deep-work-matters-distracted-world/

 
 

10 #Things to #Add to #Resume and 10 things to #Remove

An interesting Article published on Forbes News letter. The suggestions are practical and can be easily incorporated in one’s Resumes. 


But, it all depends how a Recruiter Or Hiring Managers perceives such Resumes, Many of them are still not updated and just pushing their old school of thoughts.
Below is the Link to the article. Happy Reading.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/09/11/ten-things-to-add-to-your-resume-and-ten-to-remove-immediately/#50d4b356677e

 
 

#HR #Word :#Sourcing #Plan (20/20/60)

The Essence of a 20/20/60 Sourcing Plan 

( As mentioned in article by Lou Adler)

  1. 20% of your efforts need to be posting compelling, career-oriented recruitment advertising so that the best active candidates will find it easily when searching on Google or a job board aggregator. Not only does the posting need to be easily found, but it also needs to highlight the “ideal” candidate’s intrinsic motivator. This is what motivates the person to excel and what they’re not getting in their current job. Here’s an example of how we captured this for a posting we prepared for a client earlier this year for a business unit controller.
  2. 20% of your sourcing needs to be focused on preparing short, personalized career stories that are emailed to prospective prospects. These prospects are identified using “Clever Boolean” techniques plus the advanced search filters built into LinkedIn Recruiter. Using LinkedIn’s InMail or a tool like eGrabber for extracting email addresses, it’s simple to send emails in reasonable volumes within a hour after taking a search. This needs to be followed-up with timely and persistent phone messages from the recruiter. What’s left as a voice mail is as important as the email message.
  3. 60% of a company’s sourcing efforts needs to networking-based with the objective of spending more time getting pre-qualified warm referrals, rather than making endless cold calls. Most of the initial names will be generated by using LinkedIn Recruiter to search on your co-workers’ connections, and before calling, getting the co-worker to vouch for the person. This is much more proactive than waiting for a co-worker to recommend someone. But this is just the first step. Once on the phone, there’s a heck of lot of recruiting that needs to be done. Much of this involves getting the person to consider the career opportunities involved in the open position, rather than attempting to browbeat the person into hearing about your “great” job, which is no different than every other “great” job the person has heard about.

For detailed study on this sourcing Strategy , please refer the below article by Lou Adler.

/https://www.ere.net/the-202060-sourcing-plan/

 

#HR #Word:#Holland #Vocational #Preferences

According to Holland Vocational Preferences, people make career decisions by projecting self and worldly views of work over occupational titles. 

John Holland developed the ‘theory of vocational choice’ which is widely accepted all over the world for career development. This theory postulates that the higher the degree of similarity between individual’s personality characteristics and occupational characteristics, higher is the probability of achievement of positive career outcomes like job satisfaction, promotion and achievement.

There are basic assumptions that form the basis of this theory.

1. Most people can be classified into 6 personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising or Conventional, which are summarised as RIASEC types.

2. People prefer to work in such environments which allow them to express their attitude, abilities and skills freely.

3. Individual behaviour is an outcome of his personality interacting with the environment and the characteristics of the surroundings. These outcomes can be personal competence, social behaviour, and educational behaviour and job changes.

4. Holland’s hexagonal model is to determine the congruence between a person and his occupation. A shorter distance between personality and occupation types signifies a close relationship.👇

 

5. This model also defines degree of consistency which a person or an environment possesses. The adjacent personality types on the hexagon are generally more compatible and have similar dispositions or job responsibilities. Opposite vertices on the hexagon indicate complementary or inconsistent personalities, and job functions which bear no correlation.

6. Some people or environments might be dominated heavily by one characteristic and hence are more clearly defined than others. On the other hand, if a persona bears similarity to several types, it is poorly defined or considered undifferentiated.

As per Holland, the RIASEC ( Refer the above image 👆) job environments are characterised as:

1. Realistic: Practical, rely on tools and hands-on training

2. Investigative: Explorative, analytical and with a scientific bent of mind

3. Artistic: Creative, imaginative and independent

4. Social: Amiable, cheerful, cooperative and supportive

5. Enterprising: favour competitive strides, are persuasive and possess leadership skills

6. Conventional: They are organised, systematic and like details.

 
 
 
%d bloggers like this: