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Monthly Archives: September 2017

#HR #Word:#Deep #Work

“The type of work that optimizes your performance is deep work.”

The idea of ‘deep work’ is nothing new. The term was recently coined by Cal Newport, a professor, scientist, and author of “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World.” Below are few extracts.

How to create meaningful work

Deep work does not have to be tedious. In fact, it can be enjoyable, creative, meditative, and thought-provoking. Here are some tactics to integrate the principles of deep work into your schedule:

  1. Work deeplyIt takes great patience and practice to get to the point where you can integrate long stretches of deep work into your schedule. Newport created an equation to explain the intensity required of deep work and compared it to students who pulled all-nighters in college.

Work accomplished = (time spent) x (intensity)

Work at a high level with dynamic and intense intervals that increase over time to produce a desirable outcome. Get in the zone for at least 90 minutes and build up to periods that last anywhere from two to four hours, or more.

  1. Protect your time. Maintain a set of rituals and routines to ease deep work into your day more easily. Try implementing scheduling tactics into your workflow like:

Tallies – Keep a tally of the hours you spend working, or when you reach important milestones like pages read or words written.

Deep scheduling – Try scheduling deep work hours well in advance on a calendar, like two or four weeks ahead of time.

Scheduling and tracking time has a huge benefit of giving time back. Many academics, authors, and scientists have been able to produce ample amount of work while working normal hours and having time for personal pursuits or family on evenings and weekends.

  1. Train your brain to do nothing. Try for a moment, to sit still and do nothing. How long do you find it takes until the social stimuli and buzzing signals of your mobile device prove too much? If you can embrace sitting quietly meditating or thinking, or even staring into space, then you can train your brain to spend more time in deeper work.
  1. Quit swimming upstreamDecide for yourself what restrictions you can place on email and social media by removing it from your work week altogether, or by logging out and staying off for an entire day. Evaluate your personal and professional life and experiment where social fits and where it doesn’t. Your result may be a month-long digital detox, or completely cutting the cord on social.
  1. Cut the shallow workEndless meeting requests and instant email responses are turning knowledge workers into ‘human routers’ that create the shallow work that defines many of workplaces. We’ve been groomed to reply and respond because it feels like we’re accomplishing something, when in reality, we’re not.

“Spend enough time in a state of frenetic shallowness,” Newport warns, “and you permanently reduce your capacity to perform deep work.”

Courtesy :Excerpts from below link 👇

https://blog.evernote.com/blog/2017/02/23/deep-work-matters-distracted-world/

 
 

10 #Things to #Add to #Resume and 10 things to #Remove

An interesting Article published on Forbes News letter. The suggestions are practical and can be easily incorporated in one’s Resumes. 


But, it all depends how a Recruiter Or Hiring Managers perceives such Resumes, Many of them are still not updated and just pushing their old school of thoughts.
Below is the Link to the article. Happy Reading.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/09/11/ten-things-to-add-to-your-resume-and-ten-to-remove-immediately/#50d4b356677e

 
 

#HR #Word:#Self #Handicapping

Self-handicapping is a cognitive strategy by which people avoid effort in the hopes of keeping potential failure from hurting self-esteem.


It was first theorized by Edward E. Jones and Steven Berg last, according to whom self-handicaps are obstacles created, or claimed, by the individual in anticipation of failing performance.

Self-handicapping can be seen as a method of preserving self-esteem but it can also be used for self-enhancement and to manage the impressions of others. 

This conservation or augmentation of self-esteem is due to changes in causal attributions or the attributions for success and failure that self-handicapping affords. 

There are two methods that people use to self-handicap: 

1. Behavioral and

 2. Claimed self-handicaps. 

People withdraw effort or create obstacles to successes so they can maintain public and private self-images of competence.

Self-handicapping is a widespread behavior amongst humans that has been observed in a variety of cultures and geographic areas.

 For instance, students frequently participate in self-handicapping behavior to avoid feeling bad about themselves if they do not perform well in class.

 Self-handicapping behavior has also been observed in the business world. The effects of self-handicapping can be both large and small and found in virtually any environment wherein people are expected to perform.

If people believe that they are going to fail, they create obstacles and excuses to justify their failures. There are many real world applications for this concept. 

For example, if people predict they are going to perform poorly on tasks, they create obstacles, such as taking drugs and consuming alcohol, so that they feel that they have diverted the blame from themselves if they actually do fail. In addition, another way that people self-handicap is by creating already-made excuses just in case they fail.

Source: HR Groups

 
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Posted by on September 12, 2017 in HR Word of The Day

 

#HR #Word:#Culture #Fit

Cultural fit is best understood when you consider it within the context of your organization’s culture and how your organization’s culture was formed. A potential employee may express and exhibit the characteristics, language, and values that exist within the current organizational culture – or not.

You want to hire only candidates whose belief and behavior systems appear congruent with your organizational culture.

Few Questions you can ask to assess a candidate on Cultural Fit.

  • Why do you want to work here?
  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • Tell me about a time you made a mistake. How did you address it and what did you learn?
  • What inspires you?
  • What are your hobbies?
  • What type of culture do you thrive in?
  • Describe yourself in three words.
  • What values are you drawn to and what’s your ideal workplace?
  • What’s your favourite aspect of your current position?
  • How would you describe our culture based on what you’ve seen?
  • Talk about a time you worked as part of a team.
  • What do you like best about our company?
  • How do you define success?
  • What best practices would you bring with you from another organization?
  • Tell me something about you that isn’t on your CV



Inputs from Undercover recruiter.

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2017 in HR Word of The Day

 
 
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