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#HR #Word:#Deep #Work

“The type of work that optimizes your performance is deep work.”

The idea of ‘deep work’ is nothing new. The term was recently coined by Cal Newport, a professor, scientist, and author of “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World.” Below are few extracts.

How to create meaningful work

Deep work does not have to be tedious. In fact, it can be enjoyable, creative, meditative, and thought-provoking. Here are some tactics to integrate the principles of deep work into your schedule:

  1. Work deeplyIt takes great patience and practice to get to the point where you can integrate long stretches of deep work into your schedule. Newport created an equation to explain the intensity required of deep work and compared it to students who pulled all-nighters in college.

Work accomplished = (time spent) x (intensity)

Work at a high level with dynamic and intense intervals that increase over time to produce a desirable outcome. Get in the zone for at least 90 minutes and build up to periods that last anywhere from two to four hours, or more.

  1. Protect your time. Maintain a set of rituals and routines to ease deep work into your day more easily. Try implementing scheduling tactics into your workflow like:

Tallies – Keep a tally of the hours you spend working, or when you reach important milestones like pages read or words written.

Deep scheduling – Try scheduling deep work hours well in advance on a calendar, like two or four weeks ahead of time.

Scheduling and tracking time has a huge benefit of giving time back. Many academics, authors, and scientists have been able to produce ample amount of work while working normal hours and having time for personal pursuits or family on evenings and weekends.

  1. Train your brain to do nothing. Try for a moment, to sit still and do nothing. How long do you find it takes until the social stimuli and buzzing signals of your mobile device prove too much? If you can embrace sitting quietly meditating or thinking, or even staring into space, then you can train your brain to spend more time in deeper work.
  1. Quit swimming upstreamDecide for yourself what restrictions you can place on email and social media by removing it from your work week altogether, or by logging out and staying off for an entire day. Evaluate your personal and professional life and experiment where social fits and where it doesn’t. Your result may be a month-long digital detox, or completely cutting the cord on social.
  1. Cut the shallow workEndless meeting requests and instant email responses are turning knowledge workers into ‘human routers’ that create the shallow work that defines many of workplaces. We’ve been groomed to reply and respond because it feels like we’re accomplishing something, when in reality, we’re not.

“Spend enough time in a state of frenetic shallowness,” Newport warns, “and you permanently reduce your capacity to perform deep work.”

Courtesy :Excerpts from below link 👇

https://blog.evernote.com/blog/2017/02/23/deep-work-matters-distracted-world/

 
 

10 #Things to #Add to #Resume and 10 things to #Remove

An interesting Article published on Forbes News letter. The suggestions are practical and can be easily incorporated in one’s Resumes. 


But, it all depends how a Recruiter Or Hiring Managers perceives such Resumes, Many of them are still not updated and just pushing their old school of thoughts.
Below is the Link to the article. Happy Reading.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/09/11/ten-things-to-add-to-your-resume-and-ten-to-remove-immediately/#50d4b356677e

 
 

#HR #Word :#Sourcing #Plan (20/20/60)

The Essence of a 20/20/60 Sourcing Plan 

( As mentioned in article by Lou Adler)

  1. 20% of your efforts need to be posting compelling, career-oriented recruitment advertising so that the best active candidates will find it easily when searching on Google or a job board aggregator. Not only does the posting need to be easily found, but it also needs to highlight the “ideal” candidate’s intrinsic motivator. This is what motivates the person to excel and what they’re not getting in their current job. Here’s an example of how we captured this for a posting we prepared for a client earlier this year for a business unit controller.
  2. 20% of your sourcing needs to be focused on preparing short, personalized career stories that are emailed to prospective prospects. These prospects are identified using “Clever Boolean” techniques plus the advanced search filters built into LinkedIn Recruiter. Using LinkedIn’s InMail or a tool like eGrabber for extracting email addresses, it’s simple to send emails in reasonable volumes within a hour after taking a search. This needs to be followed-up with timely and persistent phone messages from the recruiter. What’s left as a voice mail is as important as the email message.
  3. 60% of a company’s sourcing efforts needs to networking-based with the objective of spending more time getting pre-qualified warm referrals, rather than making endless cold calls. Most of the initial names will be generated by using LinkedIn Recruiter to search on your co-workers’ connections, and before calling, getting the co-worker to vouch for the person. This is much more proactive than waiting for a co-worker to recommend someone. But this is just the first step. Once on the phone, there’s a heck of lot of recruiting that needs to be done. Much of this involves getting the person to consider the career opportunities involved in the open position, rather than attempting to browbeat the person into hearing about your “great” job, which is no different than every other “great” job the person has heard about.

For detailed study on this sourcing Strategy , please refer the below article by Lou Adler.

/https://www.ere.net/the-202060-sourcing-plan/

 

#HR Word:#Consumerization of #HR

In her excellent article “Consumerization of HR: 10 trends companies will follow in 2016Jeanne Meister captured all the trends she describes under the label “Consumerisation”.

Consumerization of HR refers to creating a social, mobile, and consumer-style experience for employees inside the company

As MIT research finds, the expectation of social and collaborative tools in the workplace is no longer just a Millennial request. We are all digital citizens. The lines are blurring between HR and marketing, real estate, communications, and IT. 

The new objective is to create one employer brand which provides a seamless experience for current employees, potential employees, and consumers.

People are more and more expecting an experience at work that is comparable to the experience they have at home

What most people experience at the workplace is still far from ideal. The percentage of people who are not very happy at work is still remarkable high. 

Where is the algorithm that has suggestions for new opportunities? (“You like these type of assignments, you might also like …..”). The “Employee Experience” is very much related to this trend of Consumerization of HR

The organisations that consciously design a positive employee experience, for the complete life cycle of an employee, are still scarce.

How can We use this trend of Consumerization

Some suggestions on how you might use this trend for your benefit:

  1. Use innovative HR tools

    – Tinder like recruitment apps, such as Cocoon and Switch.
    – Explore the possibilities to use gamification in HR (recruitment, selection, onboarding, training)

  2. As HR, work closely with Marketing

    Marketing and HR are growing closer together. HR can learn a lot from Marketing.
    It is easy to start with some joint projects, e.g. around employer branding.

  3. Treat your employees as you treat you clients

    It is a worthwhile exercise to compare the way you treat your customers with the way you treat your employees.

  4. Treat your employees as individuals, not as members of a segment

    Marketing has stopped a long time ago with crude segmentation. In HR,  today most organisations still segment in simple ways. Young versus old, Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z, Managers and non-managers and so on. Many untested assumptions are used to design policies and career tracks. “Gen Y wants more work-life balance”. “People above 55 want to slow down”. With big data analysis and with sophisticated algorithms, it has become easier to detect and predict individual preferences of employees, and organisations can act on the insights with tailored programs and interventions.

  5. Use social tools in the workplace people are used to in their private life

    Do not rely on e-mail only to communicate with your employees. Use the social tools people are used to in their private life. The preferred communication channels will most likely differ for individuals. An important issue is that you must deal with security issues. Fortunately, there are look-alike solutions that can meet high security standards (e.g. a WhatsApp solutions for doctors, ShareSmart).

  6. Measure the employee experience

    There are numerous modern tools that can help you to gather feedback on how the employees experience working in your organisation (ref. Employee Mood Measurement Trends). A simple instrument as the net promoter score can help you to get feedback in near real time.           Article Source: HR Trend Institute and Forbes

 
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Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

9 Ways To Make The Wrong Impression On Your First Day

Source: 9 Ways To Make The Wrong Impression On Your First Day

9 Ways To Make The Wrong Impression On Your First Day

 

 

  Recruiters spend six seconds per resume before deciding whether an applicant is a good fit.


  • How fast? When it comes to hiring:

    • Recruiters spend six seconds per resume before deciding whether an applicant is a good fit.

    Interviewers “know” within

     10 seconds whether a      candidate is right for the job.

As a job seeker, if you make it past these 16 grueling seconds of judgment and get hired, you’re still not home free.

No, now it’s time for the next round of judging: your first day of work.

Put your best foot forward by avoiding these nine off-putting behaviors:

1. Showing Up Tired

Fact: fatigue kills your performance and productivity. Don’t give your employer second thoughts on your first day. Get plenty of rest and show up ready to bust your butt.

2. Dressing Inappropriately

People judge books by their covers, wines by their labels, and you by your first-day attire. You should know what the company dress code is by now, so pick a clean, wrinkle-free outfit that reflects it. While you’re at it, make sure you’re hygienically sound.

3. Oversharing

Being an open book is fine, but tone it down at first. Your new co-workers probably aren’t ready to hear why you were let go from your previous job or that you conceived your 16-year-old son on a first date in high school.

4. Complaining

Your parking spot is a mile away, the training for new hires is putting you to sleep, and you’re not that fond of your cubemate. Annoying? Perhaps. Worth mentioning? No. Workplace negativity is toxic and will send your new co-workers running.

5. Flirting

Are you there to work or find a date for Friday night? Even if your company is all right with office relationships, jumping into one right away brings your professional brand into question.

Would you rather be labeled “the new guy who’s amazing at sales” or “the new guy who’s dating Jane”? Establish yourself first, then decide whether dating Jane is worth it.

6. Saying ‘No’ To Lunch Invites

As the new face around the office, you’ll be invited by co-workers to lunch, coffee, happy hour, and other events outside of the office. Don’t turn them down. This is how you become part of the company’s family, an important step for both personal and professional growth.

7. Trying To Make Your New Job Like Your Old Job

Organizations have deeply rooted ways of doing things. If you come in and insist others do it your way, it’s not going to go well. I have a good friend who experienced this recently. He works for a company with a fast-paced, startup mentality. A new guy just joined from the slow-moving corporate world (The Land of Red Tape, as I like to call it) and continues to add in the extra steps and checks he’s used to.

It’s fine to make suggestions, but first ask yourself why you’re making them. Do you really see room for improvement or are you just being stubborn in your ways? If it’s the former, go for it; if not, then let go and move on.

8. Forgetting To Say ‘Thank You’

It takes time to train new hires. Even those with years of experience need to learn the nuances of the company and its culture. So thank co-workers who take the time out of their busy day to help you, even if all they did was point you to the nearest restroom.

9. Concealing Your Excitement

Excitement, like negativity, is contagious. The difference is that excitement is a great feeling to catch. It’s easy for long-time employees to lose sight of why their job is so great. Having a new, excited face around the office is an excellent reminder. If you’re that face, people will be drawn to you.

None of this is to say you should lie to your co-workers or not be yourself in front of them. Just be a more tactful, selective version of yourself for a while.

P.S. Sound like too many things to concern yourself with? We agree. That’s why, in addition to recommending the behavior above, we encourage you to be aware of your own judgements and give the next new employee a break.

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2017 in Being HR, Uncategorized

 

#HR Word #Distinctive #Capabilities

Distinctive Capabilities 

This is a theory given by John Kay. According to him, distinctive capabilities are a relevant factor of an organization’s resources.

Companies with distinctive capabilities have attributes, which others don’t have and cannot replicate.

According to John Kay, there are three distinctive capabilities which a company can possess to achieve competitive advantage through relationships:

  • Architecture: It is a structure of relational contacts within or around the organization with customers, suppliers and with employees

  • Reputation: This includes customer’s own experience, quality signals, guarantee, word of mouth spreading, warranty, association with other brands and staking the reputation, once it is established

  • Innovation: Provided that the innovation is translate d to competitive advantage successfully
 
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Posted by on February 13, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

 Guide to #SocialRecruiting

Using social media as a tool for recruiting does not stop at posting jobs. 

#Social media offers a platform to showcase your company brand and  culture to prospective hires, illustrating to candidates who exactly you are as an organisation.

# It helps you build a talent pool by taking advantage of your existing network of connections.

 #It assists in sourcing andacquiring talent.

The whole lifecycle of recruiting is seen to, with even background checks being simplified by this resource. 

Best thing of all about social recruiting is it requires little financial input, just a little organisation, planning and creativity, which is ideal for any growing business. 

Once you post regularly and keep in conversation with your online connections, you’ve pretty much got the knack of it. 

Once you get the basics covered and bear your hiring objectives in the forefront of your mind, your only real limit in social media recruiting is your imagination.

The Below Link Covers Strategies for embarking upon your adventure in social media recruiting.

Download the PDF Line and design your strategy for Social Recruiting

http://hirehive.io/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Your-guide-to-Social-Recruiting-HireHive-Handbook.pdf

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2017 in Uncategorized

 
 
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